How people in South Ossetia, Abkhazia and Transnistria feel about annexation by Russia


After the annexation of Crimea, the leadership of Transnistria requested annexation into the Russian Federation, also.

I have been studying this region for nigh on 4 years, so I don’t quite know what other people find particularly interesting. In light of the events in Ukraine, nations of the CIS like Moldova split along tenuous ethnic and cultural lines are becoming more relevant.

So, is there something in particular you want to see from me? I have been a bit lacking in original content…..

sunnydriveinsarajevo:

People already talking about how Russia might “take” Transnistria and gagauzia next smh 😒

(Source: mean-dauphin)

antozock:

Pridnestrovie

Trieste-Odessa

(via mean-dauphin)

antozock:

Tiraspol

Trieste-Odessa

(via mean-dauphin)

Gagauzia Voters Reject Closer EU Ties For Moldova

Breakaway Moldovan Region Adopts Russian Laws

(Source: en-md)

blexsspace:

Reportage: Kosuke Okahara - No Man’s Land


I’d point out that families of the elderly and their grandchildren isn’t unique to Transnistria, it is estimated that approximately 50% of Moldova’s working-age adults have left the country in order to work in Russia, or other countries in Eastern and Western europe

sunnydriveinsarajevo:

horse racing, Gagauzia Autonomous Region, Moldova

sunnydriveinsarajevo:

horse racing, Gagauzia Autonomous Region, Moldova

(Source: pjesmaviteza, via mean-dauphin)

magnumfoundation:

"Transnistria for me was more of a personal project. I was born in that place and attended school there. As many places, Transnistria was under pro-russian propaganda. I wanted to document this region traveling not to just a few villages and the capital, Tiraspol, as other photographers did. For me, it’s more than just an impact on an exotic place, but my past and experience I have gone through. My thinking changed since attending the Human Rights & Photography Fellowship. Classes with Susan Meiselas and Fred Ritchin helped me to develop my visual storytelling skills, pushed me to use photography not only as a showing tool, but as an analyzing tool. 

And now i see Transnistria as a more complex project with multiple stories that will remain in history as imagery of a country which will probably disappear soon. Immediately after returning home, I’ve re-edited all existing photos in color and scheduled the route with all the places that I should visit and where I can find stories. I want to share with local communities on both banks of the Dniester river about how is it to live in this forgotten country with no perspectives for future generations.”

-Ramin Mazur, Moldova, 2013 Human Rights Fellow

Applications for the 2014 Human Rights & Photography Fellowship are due December 9th. Click here to apply!